Syriacide ~ Above the Cut

Published September 17, 2019 by paulandpaulasbooks

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I was given the opportunity to read and to first edit this novel, Syriacide that in my opinion was more real to a reporting of the horror of not just a war but one threaded and laced with terrorism.

This story has a gut-wrenching fire of a journalist trapped in an evolving series of atrocities that could and would shatter the soul of anyone caught in this abyss of the killing of a country.

Syriacide is in its final editing stages soon to hit the major online sellers.

For now, I urge you to follow Michael Patrick Mulvihill, then go next with a read that should have been reported in the news as such for this genocidal horror truly was and in pockets of Syria still is.

Michael Mulvihill’s Writing group on Facebook

Entitlement, just another name for Ignorance?

Published August 27, 2019 by paulandpaulasbooks

I came upon a piece by a young college graduate which hit a chord. I will share it a bit further down. One of the first articles I did for Angie’s Diary was Is This Generation Worse?

Being a Libra, I tend to weigh and often will come down on the side of my opposing opinion, once it is argued out. My oldest son is the same, in so much as playing chess, both sides, one being his and the other his phantom player, who sometimes wins the match in a logical progression of moves. That is the ability to put one in the other’s place.

It helps me in my writing dialogue and staying in a character’s character, so to speak.

A statement by a congresswoman was made, true to her, one must surmise, as the conclusions made by the writer was that many in her generation feel lack of opportunity in their jobless situation, at least in their field of study.

It was no different in the 1960s or 70s or 80s or 90s. There was a glut of students vying for the same job as in the market today and as in the market today, the top achievers were the ones hired. A big difference was that most of the students did not go to college on their parent’s dime nor did they accrue huge outstanding yokes of debt that many students wear into their twilight years.

Why? Because those that chose college had to pay for it themselves. The entitlement was the very rich, and the determined middle class and poor who went on partial or a miracle full scholarship. And, working full-time jobs in the off-college hours to pay their way. The difference was the hand was not out for the previous generation to foot the bill. That was the entitlement and privilege of previous generations. No handouts.

And, the power of the internet to share from one pillar to another post.

A friend’s posting:

Richie Furay

HMMM, VERY ENLIGHTENING, yes it is! A friend of mine posted this which I certainly agree with (and I’m hoping it’s OK to repost to my “friends”); I know we’re used to quick “sound-bytes” and it’ll take a minute to read this but, maybe it’s time we stop and really consider what’s going on right before our very eyes before any more of the “fundamental transformation of America” undermines the future of our kids and grandkids:

My friend wrote: I was enlightened by this article sent to me by a friend from Canada who monitors world events including those in the United States. It was written by a 26-year-old woman sitting in a coffee shop in Florida.

Thoughts wrote by Alyssa Ahlgren.

“I’m sitting in a small coffee shop near Nokomis, FL trying to think of what to write about. I scroll through my news feed on my phone looking at the latest headlines of Democratic candidates calling for policies to “fix” the so-called injustices of capitalism. I put my phone down and continue to look around. I see people talking freely, working on their MacBook’s, ordering the food they get in an instant, seeing cars go by outside, and it dawned on me.
We live in the most privileged time in the most prosperous nation and we’ve become completely blind to it. Vehicles, food, technology, freedom to associate with whom we choose. These things are so ingrained in our American way of life we don’t give them a second thought.
We are so well off here in the United States that our poverty line begins 31 times above the global average. Thirty-One. Times. Virtually no one in the United States is considered poor by global standards.
Yet, in a time where we can order a product off Amazon with one click and have it at our doorstep the next day, we are unappreciative, unsatisfied, and ungrateful.
Our un-appreciation is evident as the popularity of socialist policies among my generation continues to grow. Democratic Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez recently said to Newsweek talking about the millennial generation: “An entire generation, which is now becoming one of the largest electorates in America, came of age and never saw American prosperity.” Never saw American prosperity. Let that sink in.

When I first read that statement, I thought to myself that was quite literally the most entitled and factually illiterate thing I’ve ever heard in my 26 years on this earth. Now, I’m not attributing Miss Ocasio-Cortez’s words to outright dishonesty. I do think she whole-heartedly believes the words she said to be true. Many young people agree with her, which is entirely misguided. My generation is being indoctrinated by a mainstream narrative to actually believe we have never seen prosperity. I know this first hand, I went to college, let’s just say I didn’t have the popular opinion, but I digress.
Let me lay down some universal truths really quick.
The United States of America has lifted more people out of abject poverty, spread more freedom and democracy, and has created more innovation in technology and medicine than any other nation in human history.
Not only that but our citizenry continually breaks world records with charitable donations, the rags to riches story is not only possible in America but not uncommon, we have the strongest purchasing power on earth, and we encompass 25% of the world’s GDP. The list goes on.
However, these universal truths don’t matter. We are told that income inequality is an existential crisis (even though this is not an indicator of prosperity, some of the poorest countries in the world have low-income inequality), we are told that we are oppressed by capitalism (even though it’s brought about more freedom and wealth to the most people than any other system in world history), we are told that the only way we will acquire the benefits of true prosperity is through socialism and centralization of federal power (even though history has proven time and again this only brings tyranny and suffering). Why then, with all of the overwhelming evidence around us, evidence that I can even see sitting at a coffee shop, do we not view this as prosperity?
We have people who are dying to get into our country.
People around the world destitute and truly impoverished.
Yet, we have a young generation convinced they’ve never seen prosperity, and as a result, elect politicians dead set on taking steps towards abolishing capitalism.
Why? The answer is this, my generation has ONLY seen prosperity. We have no contrast. We didn’t live in the great depression, or live through two world wars, or see the rise and fall of socialism and communism. We don’t know what it’s like not to live without the internet, without cars, without smartphones.
We don’t have a lack of prosperity problem. We have an entitlement problem, an ungratefulness problem, and it’s spreading like a plague.
With the current political climate giving rise to the misguided idea of a socialist utopia, will we see the light?
Or will we have to lose it all to realize that what we have now is true prosperity?
Destroying the free market will undo what millions of people have died to achieve. My generation is becoming the largest voting bloc in the country. We have an opportunity to continue to propel us forward with the gifts capitalism and democracy has given us. The other option is that we can fall into the trap of entitlement and relapse into restrictive socialist destitution.
The choice doesn’t seem too hard, does it?”

Kamsi -revisited

Published August 10, 2019 by paulandpaulasbooks

If taking your sleep is the price to pay to help this child, I urge you to take it without regret.

I visited Delta clinic Port Harcourt Rivers State Nigeria, yesterday to donate blood to little Kamsi (Chikanka Nwachukwu) to help her see another day. But how long will she continue to live this way?
Below is her medical report from the hospital to ascertain her medical condition. I appeal to you in every humility to help get help for her. Her time is ticking away faster than for us who are healthy.

Man is God to man…do not forget.

Rivers State University

In Kamsi’s part of the world as in most parts of the world, one must have the funds to be given treatment. If you are poor or become poor through ongoing treatment or some chance of fortune renders you poor, you are destined to die.
Every Child Lifeline Charity Foundation is newly formed, still cutting red tape and jumping hoops to collect the money needed for Kamsi and other dire needs for seven orphanages and close to 1,000 orphans.
   This is a viable link for donations:
DONATE directly to Every Child Lifeline Charity Foundation –
Mobile#+234070399792667
Polaris Bank
Douglas Road
Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria 460221
Routing/Sort# 011102793
Account # 4091208773
Mobile#+234070399792667
Incorporation papers found at – https://eveychildlife.wordpress.com/…/09/the-journey-begins/
God called us to help the children. I also know many people who cannot donate because of lack of funds. I know God is the ultimate provider and the ultimate healer.
If you are able to donate for her operation, she is in need of $10,000 USD.
    If you cannot, I earnestly ask you and your friends and their friends, and theirs to go to God in prayer and ask for a miracle for this child. I have put her on the altar before God in my prayers asking for healing – a reversal in her lack of bone marrow. She is a tiny warrior in need of God’s touch.
This is a picture of Kamsi after receiving blood from our CEO, Collins Emeghara
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UPTH
Kamsi’s father’s appeal for his daughter life
jhjolkp     When he says 15 million he is referring to Nigerian coin, the equivalent of $10,000 USD
I ask for a coin if you are able and do know that what we in America consider small amounts equate to more when sending to Africa or India ( we have an orphanage there as well)
I ask and covet prayers for miracles. God has given me many and my belief in that tells me to ask you to pray and ask you to ask your friends – prayers are mightier.  May you be blessed one hundredfold in whichever path you follow in God’s will.
       ~ Paula Louise Shene, Chief Administration Officer of Every Child Lifelife Charity Foundation
Twenty-four years ago I had stage three aggressive breast cancer. I found a lump the size of a small marble on a Friday and it was removed the following Tuesday along with 19 lymph nodes. The lump grew into the size of a golf ball in four days. I had radical treatment of five months of chemotherapy and treatment of thirty-five minutes per day every day including weekends for five weeks of radiation – most people die of other causes from the treatment.
There were people from coast to coast in the United States praying for my recovery.
I believe the prayers of those who believe in God’s mercy and grace and healing can help bring a miracle to Kamsi.
This is my appeal to you for her.

Kamsi Nwachukwu – A cry for help

Published July 7, 2019 by paulandpaulasbooks

DONATE directly to Every Child Lifeline Charity Foundation –
Mobile#+234070399792667
Polaris Bank
Douglas Road
Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria 460221
Routing/Sort# 011102793
Account # 4091208773
Mobile#+234070399792667
Incorporation papers found at – https://eveychildlife.wordpress.com/…/09/the-journey-begins/

~ Paula Shene, Administrator of:every child lifeline charity foundation logo
Kamsi Nwachukwu is in need of sponsors – Please read the plea of the CEO, Collins Emeghara, of Every Child Lifeline Charity Foundation.

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Kamsi Nwachukwu is only five years old and would’ve been playing with her friends if she was not bedridden. Her body is not producing blood and her blood does not clot either. She needs an emergency bone marrow transplant that would cost well over five million Naira that is about ten thousand US dollars.
Mercy doctors can also help in the surgical procedure if only they walk this way; hence she would only need a donor for the transplant. You can help her to live, yes, you can. As she solely depends on blood transfusion to live, you can be her next donor if you live within Nigeria.


You can also help to foot her medical bills from any part of the world. Nothing is too small; I pray thee. 


It’s of the mercy of God that she is still alive till this day for every other in her ward has died a long time ago. Doctors are tired as no helpers are coming, her parents are weary for her father, Mr. Anthony Nwachukwu had a crippling accident two months ago as he ran like a helpless chicken to get help for his dying daughter. Every other father would do the same if you were in his shoes. He said to me as I speak with him this morning “The only job I do now is to give her blood” Those words moved me to write about her yet again; as weariness was sticking in his voice. 


I urge you to give a helping hand to this family if you can, but if you do not have, you can also help to share her story—who knows if a helper would come through you? Please help this child to live.

She is still lying helpless at U.P.T.H that’s University of Portharcort Teaching Hospital, l Rivers state, Nigeria. If you are not comfortable working with us, we are willing to give you her father’s link to ensure accountability.
The interest of Every child lifeline foundation is only to give a helpless child a voice when we cannot foot her bills. I encourage you to support this mission to Rehabilitate a forgotten child of the world.
DONATE directly to Every Child Lifeline Charity Foundation –
Mobile#+234070399792667
Polaris Bank
Douglas Road
Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria 460221
Routing/Sort# 011102793
Account # 4091208773
Mobile#+234070399792667
Incorporation papers found at – https://eveychildlife.wordpress.com/…/09/the-journey-begins/

In the coming weeks, I will introduce you to other children, some of which have recently died for lack of clean water. There is an airborne virus’ infecting water supplies. There is much need for supplies and money to build wells with pumps and adequate purifiers and these can be done for less than $3,000 USD, an amount insurmountable in Nigeria’s poverty-stricken country.

There is a need for supplies for daily survival. We in America, even the poor, have more. I will share a list needed in a future posting.  If you cannot afford coin, please share.

Every Child Lifeline Newsletter, Vol.1

Published May 20, 2019 by paulandpaulasbooks

The Every Child Lifeline Charity Foundation is to facilitate orphanages throughout the world starting with groundbreaking in Nigeria.  Please visit our Facebook page, Every Child Lifeline Charity Foundation

Donation link to Every Child lifeline Charity Foundation

SOCIO-ECONOMIC DOWN TRENDING EVEN ON AFRICAN MONTH CELEBRATIONS

The Month of May is celebrated globally to mark the ‘scramble of Africa’ by numerous European countries since 1855. This period otherwise referred to as the ‘Era of Imperialism’ saw European countries tearing Africa apart like birds and bees perching wildflowers in search of nectarine.

The era as described by an erstwhile writer of Russian origin, Conquery Vidrovich marked the creation of world poverty. In the same breath a radical Walter Rodney, development study guru ascribed to this era, the underdevelopment of Africa by Europe.

The object of this publication is in no way an attempt to unbundle historical baggage, but rather to a reasonably objective appraisal of the problem of child neglect, abuse, and abandonment through time. Obviously, and inevitably such an assessment will have to shed light on the impact the various historical milestones development stages impacted the child.

Professor Ali Mazrui has written in a string of academic publications on the transatlantic slave trade and colonialism how the African family structures were violently and grossly shaken to the ground.

In the era of the territorial imperative, the West docked the slave ships away forever and launched the gunboats in their place. This was the era of imperialism and gunboat diplomacy. Whatever happens, we have got the maxim and they have not! The West stopped exporting Africa’s sons and daughters and colonized Africa itself. Imperialism and gunboat diplomacy was part of the ugly side of globalization. Raw materials for Western manufacturing industries became a major temptation. In the same breath, Bede Eke of Nigeria explained in his Doctoral thesis on ‘Intergenerational Impact of AIDS Epidemic in Nigeria that the advent of colonialism in the 19th century, the wave of modernization, and the new idea of nuclear family systems, intergenerational bonds and relationships were weakened to an extent. But the arrival of the AIDS epidemic in the 1980s and its steady increase worsened the situation. Intergenerational relationships have been affected to the extent that bonds between generations are collapsing. The resultant social isolation and stigmatization of the affected and infected compounded the problem of Orphan Vulnerable Children (OVC).

Donation link to Every Child Lifeline Charity Foundation

 

AFRICA’S RESPONSE POST-COLONIALISM

Are we breaking the ground?

A simple straight-forward answer to the question is simply negative – Not at all. If research is anything to go by, current statistics suggest a horrifying figure so astronomical that it becomes even more than eyebrow-raising. It is estimated that in Africa as a whole a child becomes an Orphan Vulnerable Child (OVC) every 15 seconds which translates into four children every minute and about two-hundred and forty every hour (240) and 5760 daily. Even the negative stabilizing factors of infant, child, and adult mortality rate does not have an impact. To assess the validity of this figures, one has to look at the life expectancy rate of African countries which is comparatively very low, for instance, South Africa is at 54 while Nigeria is at 47.

Nigeria defines an orphan as a child (0-17 years) who have lost one or both parents. A child is vulnerable if, because of the circumstances of birth or immediate environment, is prone to abuse or deprivation of basic needs, care and protection and thus disadvantaged relative to his or her peers (FMWA&SD 2008). A vulnerable child is one (that): with inadequate access to education, health and other social support, has a chronically ill parent, lives in a household with terminally or chronically ill parent(s) or caregiver(s), lives outside of family care (lives with extended family, in institution, or on street), is infected with HIV (FMWA&SD 2006). The list of categories of OVC is long and varied; in addition to the above, a vulnerable child includes: children in need of alternative family care; children who are abused or neglected; children in hard-to-reach areas; children with disability-related vulnerability; children affected by armed conflict; and children in need of legal protection (FMWA&SD 2007). The FMWA&SD also gives a list of children perceived to be ‘extremely vulnerable’ in communities (Figure 1), derived from consultations with stakeholders:

Figure 1: Categories of vulnerable children as perceived by communities, National Plan of Action 2006 – 2010 – Children with physical and mental disabilities

– Sexually abused children

– Neglected children

– Children in conflict with the law

– Exploited “Alamgir”

– Child beggars, destitute children, and scavengers

– Children from broken homes

– Child sex workers

– Children whose parents have a disability

– Children who marry before the age of 18

– Children who have dropped out of school

– Abandoned children

– Children living with terminally or chronically ill parent(s) and

caregiver(s)

– Child laborers

– Children in child-headed homes

– Internally displaced children

– Children hawkers

– Trafficked children

– Children of migrant workers such as fishermen, nomads

– Children living with HIV

– Children living with aged/frail grandparents (TO BE CONTINUED IN THE NEXT ISSUE)

Author: Tshengwane Jeremia Bokaba

AFRICA’S RESPONSE POST-COLONIALISM

Are we breaking the ground?

A simple straight-forward answer to the question is simply negative – Not at all. If research is anything to go by, current statistics suggest a horrifying figure so astronomical that it becomes even more than eyebrow-raising. It is estimated that in Africa as a whole a child becomes an Orphan Vulnerable Child (OVC) every 15 seconds which translates into four children every minute and about two-hundred and forty every hour (240) and 5760 daily. Even the negative stabilizing factors of infant, child, and adult mortality rate does not have an impact. To assess the validity of this figures, one has to look at the life expectancy rate of African countries which is comparatively very low, for instance, South Africa is at 54 while Nigeria is at 47.

Nigeria defines an orphan as a child (0-17 years) who have lost one or both parents. A child is vulnerable if, because of the circumstances of birth or immediate environment, is prone to abuse or deprivation of basic needs, care and protection and thus disadvantaged relative to his or her peers (FMWA&SD 2008). A vulnerable child is one (that): with inadequate access to education, health and other social support, has a chronically ill parent, lives in a household with terminally or chronically ill parent(s) or caregiver(s), lives outside of family care (lives with extended family, an institution, or on street), is infected with HIV (FMWA&SD 2006). The list of categories of OVC is long and varied; in addition to the above, a vulnerable child includes: children in need of alternative family care; children who are abused or neglected; children in hard-to-reach areas; children with disability-related vulnerability; children affected by armed conflict; and children in need of legal protection (FMWA&SD 2007). The FMWA&SD also gives a list of children perceived to be ‘extremely vulnerable’ in communities (Figure 1), derived from consultations with stakeholders:

Figure 1: Categories of vulnerable children as perceived by communities, National Plan of Action 2006 – 2010 – Children with physical and mental disabilities

– Sexually abused children

– Neglected children

– Children in conflict with the law

– Exploited “Alamgir”

– Child beggars, destitute children and scavengers

– Children from broken homes

– Child sex workers

– Children whose parents have a disability

– Children who marry before the age of 18

– Children who have dropped out of school

– Abandoned children

– Children living with terminally or chronically ill parent(s) and

caregiver(s)

– Child laborers

– Children in child-headed homes

– Internally displaced children

– Children hawkers

– Trafficked children

– Children of migrant workers such as fishermen, nomads

– Children living with HIV

– Children living with aged/frail grandparents (TO BE CONTINUED IN THE NEXT ISSUE)

Author: Tshengwane Jeremia Bokaba

Donations to Every Child Lifeline Charity Foundation link

Guest Column

Child violence experiences in institutionalized/

orphanage care

Lorraine Sherr, Kathryn J. Roberts & Natasha Gandhi

ABSTRACT

Institutions are not necessarily good environments for children.

In the face of challenges such as HIV, Ebola, poverty, conflict, and

disaster the numbers have grown rather than reduced. Some

countries have closed institutions down driven by findings that

cognitive developmental delay is associated with institutional care.

Yet insight into abuse and violence within institutionalized settings is

neglected. Maltreatment -violence, and abuse -may be an issue. This

systematic review series addresses violence and abuse experiences in

institutionalized care, exploring firstly the frequency of abuse/violence

in institutions, secondly, any interventions to reduce such violence or

abuse and thirdly the perpetrators of such violence or abuse. The final

systematic review updates the findings on cognitive delay associated

with institutionalized care. With a violence lens, a cognitive delay may well be considered under the umbrella of neglect. Maltreatment

and abuse may be a driver of cognitive delay. The keyword search covered several electronic databases and studies were included for data abstraction if they met adequacy criteria.

Guest Column

Child violence experiences in institutionalized/

orphanage care

Lorraine Sherr, Kathryn J. Roberts & Natasha Gandhi

ABSTRACT

Institutions are not necessarily good environments for children.

In the face of challenges such as HIV, Ebola, poverty, conflict, and

disaster the numbers have grown rather than reduced. Some

countries have closed institutions down driven by findings that

cognitive developmental delay is associated with institutional care.

Yet insight into abuse and violence within institutionalized settings is

neglected. Maltreatment -violence, and abuse -may be an issue. This

systematic review series addresses violence and abuse experiences in

institutionalized care, exploring firstly the frequency of abuse/violence

in institutions, secondly any interventions to reduce such violence or

abuse and thirdly the perpetrators of such violence or abuse. The final

systematic review updates the findings on cognitive delay associated

with institutionalized care. With a violence lens, a cognitive delay may well be considered under the umbrella of neglect. Maltreatment

and abuse may be a driver of cognitive delay. The keyword search covered several electronic databases and studies were included for

data abstraction if they met adequacy criteria. Eight studies were

identified on the prevalence of abuse in institutions and a further

three studies reported on interventions. Only one study was identified

documenting peer on peer violence in institutions. Sixty-six studies

were identified examining cognitive development for institutionalized

children. All but two of these record cognitive deficits associated with

institutionalization. Only two asked about violence or abuse which

was found to be higher in institutionalized children. Overall the abuse

experiences of children in institutions are poorly recorded, and in one

study violence was associated with high suicidal attempts. The major

intervention pathway for ameliorating cognitive challenge seems

to be placed out of the institutions which show benefits and

redresses some cognitive outcomes – yet not a total panacea. The

single study providing training and monitoring of harsh punishment

and maltreatment showed immediate and decided reductions. This

data suggest, despite the paucity of studies, violence, and abuse, by

commission or omission is prevalent in institutions, influences

child well-being and is amenable to intervention. Simple training

or more complex structures to place children within conducive

alternative environments (or to avoid institutionalized placements in the first place)

seem to be the main pathway of intervention.

Published with courtesy of the Commons who hold the copyright of the material and may

not be used for commercial purposes.

Donation Link Every Child Lifeline Charity Foundation

 

 

Guest Column

Child violence experiences in institutionalised/

orphanage care

Lorraine Sherr, Kathryn J. Roberts & Natasha Gandhi

ABSTRACT

Institutions are not necessarily good environments for children.

In the face of challenges such as HIV, Ebola, poverty, conflict and

disaster the numbers have grown rather than reduced. Some

countries have closed institutions down driven by findings that

cognitive developmental delay is associated with institutional care.

Yet insight into abuse and violence within institutionalised settings is

neglected. Maltreatment -violence and abuse -may be an issue. This

systematic review series addresses violence and abuse experiences in

institutionalised care, exploring firstly the frequency of abuse/violence

in institutions, secondly any interventions to reduce such violence or

abuse and thirdly the perpetrators of such violence or abuse. The final

systematic review updates the findings on cognitive delay associated

with institutionalised care. With a violence lens, cognitive delay may well be considered under the umbrella of neglect. Maltreatment

and abuse may be a driver of cognitive delay. The keyword search covered several electronic databases and studies were included for

data abstraction if they met adequacy criteria. Eight studies were

identified on the prevalence of abuse in institutions and a further

three studies reported on interventions. Only one study was identified

documenting peer on peer violence in institutions. Sixty-six studies

were identified examining cognitive development for institutionalised

children. All but two of these record cognitive deficits associated with

institutionalisation. Only two asked about violence or abuse which

was found to be higher in institutionalised children. Overall the abuse

experiences of children in institutions are poorly recorded, and in one

study violence was associated with high suicidal attempts. The major

intervention pathway for ameliorating cognitive challenge seems

to be placement out of the institutions which shows benefits and

redresses some cognitive outcomes – yet not a total panacea. The

single study providing training and monitoring of harsh punishment

and maltreatment showed immediate and decided reductions. This

data suggest, despite the paucity of studies, violence and abuse, by

commission or omission is prevalent in institutions, influences

child well-being and is amenable to intervention. Simple training

or more complex structures to place children within conducive

alternative environments (or to avoid institutionalised placements in the first place) seem to be the main pathway of intervention.

Published with courtersy of the Commons who hold copyright of the material and may not be uesd for commercial purposes.

Guest Column

Child violence experiences in institutionalised/

orphanage care

Lorraine Sherr, Kathryn J. Roberts & Natasha Gandhi

ABSTRACT

Institutions are not necessarily good environments for children.

In the face of challenges such as HIV, Ebola, poverty, conflict and

disaster the numbers have grown rather than reduced. Some

countries have closed institutions down driven by findings that

cognitive developmental delay is associated with institutional care.

Yet insight into abuse and violence within institutionalised settings is

neglected. Maltreatment -violence and abuse -may be an issue. This

systematic review series addresses violence and abuse experiences in

institutionalised care, exploring firstly the frequency of abuse/violence

in institutions, secondly any interventions to reduce such violence or

abuse and thirdly the perpetrators of such violence or abuse. The final

systematic review updates the findings on cognitive delay associated

with institutionalised care. With a violence lens, cognitive delay may well be considered under the umbrella of neglect. Maltreatment

and abuse may be a driver of cognitive delay. The keyword search covered several electronic databases and studies were included for

data abstraction if they met adequacy criteria. Eight studies were

identified on the prevalence of abuse in institutions and a further

three studies reported on interventions. Only one study was identified

documenting peer on peer violence in institutions. Sixty-six studies

were identified examining cognitive development for institutionalised

children. All but two of these record cognitive deficits associated with

institutionalisation. Only two asked about violence or abuse which

was found to be higher in institutionalised children. Overall the abuse

experiences of children in institutions are poorly recorded, and in one

study violence was associated with high suicidal attempts. The major

intervention pathway for ameliorating cognitive challenge seems

to be placement out of the institutions which shows benefits and

redresses some cognitive outcomes – yet not a total panacea. The

single study providing training and monitoring of harsh punishment

and maltreatment showed immediate and decided reductions. This

data suggest, despite the paucity of studies, violence and abuse, by

commission or omission is prevalent in institutions, influences

child well-being and is amenable to intervention. Simple training

or more complex structures to place children within conducive

alternative environments (or to avoid institutionalised placements in the first place) seem to be the main pathway of intervention.

Published with courtersy of the Commons who hold copyright of the material and may not be uesd for commercial purposes.

Guest Column

Child violence experiences in institutionalised/

orphanage care

Lorraine Sherr, Kathryn J. Roberts & Natasha Gandhi

ABSTRACT

Institutions are not necessarily good environments for children.

In the face of challenges such as HIV, Ebola, poverty, conflict and

disaster the numbers have grown rather than reduced. Some

countries have closed institutions down driven by findings that

cognitive developmental delay is associated with institutional care.

Yet insight into abuse and violence within institutionalised settings is

neglected. Maltreatment -violence and abuse -may be an issue. This

systematic review series addresses violence and abuse experiences in

institutionalised care, exploring firstly the frequency of abuse/violence

in institutions, secondly any interventions to reduce such violence or

abuse and thirdly the perpetrators of such violence or abuse. The final

systematic review updates the findings on cognitive delay associated

with institutionalised care. With a violence lens, cognitive delay may well be considered under the umbrella of neglect. Maltreatment

and abuse may be a driver of cognitive delay. The keyword search covered several electronic databases and studies were included for

data abstraction if they met adequacy criteria. Eight studies were

identified on the prevalence of abuse in institutions and a further

three studies reported on interventions. Only one study was identified

documenting peer on peer violence in institutions. Sixty-six studies

were identified examining cognitive development for institutionalised

children. All but two of these record cognitive deficits associated with

institutionalisation. Only two asked about violence or abuse which

was found to be higher in institutionalised children. Overall the abuse

experiences of children in institutions are poorly recorded, and in one

study violence was associated with high suicidal attempts. The major

intervention pathway for ameliorating cognitive challenge seems

to be placement out of the institutions which shows benefits and

redresses some cognitive outcomes – yet not a total panacea. The

single study providing training and monitoring of harsh punishment

and maltreatment showed immediate and decided reductions. This

data suggest, despite the paucity of studies, violence and abuse, by

commission or omission is prevalent in institutions, influences

child well-being and is amenable to intervention. Simple training

or more complex structures to place children within conducive

alternative environments (or to avoid institutionalised placements in the first place) seem to be the main pathway of intervention.

Published with courtersy of the Commons who hold copyright of the material and may not be uesd for commercial purposes.

Guest Column

Child violence experiences in institutionalised/

orphanage care

Lorraine Sherr, Kathryn J. Roberts & Natasha Gandhi

ABSTRACT

Institutions are not necessarily good environments for children.

In the face of challenges such as HIV, Ebola, poverty, conflict and

disaster the numbers have grown rather than reduced. Some

countries have closed institutions down driven by findings that

cognitive developmental delay is associated with institutional care.

Yet insight into abuse and violence within institutionalised settings is

neglected. Maltreatment -violence and abuse -may be an issue. This

systematic review series addresses violence and abuse experiences in

institutionalised care, exploring firstly the frequency of abuse/violence

in institutions, secondly any interventions to reduce such violence or

abuse and thirdly the perpetrators of such violence or abuse. The final

systematic review updates the findings on cognitive delay associated

with institutionalised care. With a violence lens, cognitive delay may well be considered under the umbrella of neglect. Maltreatment

and abuse may be a driver of cognitive delay. The keyword search covered several electronic databases and studies were included for

data abstraction if they met adequacy criteria. Eight studies were

identified on the prevalence of abuse in institutions and a further

three studies reported on interventions. Only one study was identified

documenting peer on peer violence in institutions. Sixty-six studies

were identified examining cognitive development for institutionalised

children. All but two of these record cognitive deficits associated with

institutionalisation. Only two asked about violence or abuse which

was found to be higher in institutionalised children. Overall the abuse

experiences of children in institutions are poorly recorded, and in one

study violence was associated with high suicidal attempts. The major

intervention pathway for ameliorating cognitive challenge seems

to be placement out of the institutions which shows benefits and

redresses some cognitive outcomes – yet not a total panacea. The

single study providing training and monitoring of harsh punishment

and maltreatment showed immediate and decided reductions. This

data suggest, despite the paucity of studies, violence and abuse, by

commission or omission is prevalent in institutions, influences

child well-being and is amenable to intervention. Simple training

or more complex structures to place children within conducive

alternative environments (or to avoid institutionalised placements in the first place) seem to be the main pathway of intervention.

Published with courtersy of the Commons who hold copyright of the material and may not be uesd for commercial purposes.

Guest Column

Child violence experiences in institutionalised/

orphanage care

Lorraine Sherr, Kathryn J. Roberts & Natasha Gandhi

ABSTRACT

Institutions are not necessarily good environments for children.

In the face of challenges such as HIV, Ebola, poverty, conflict and

disaster the numbers have grown rather than reduced. Some

countries have closed institutions down driven by findings that

cognitive developmental delay is associated with institutional care.

Yet insight into abuse and violence within institutionalised settings is

neglected. Maltreatment -violence and abuse -may be an issue. This

systematic review series addresses violence and abuse experiences in

institutionalised care, exploring firstly the frequency of abuse/violence

in institutions, secondly any interventions to reduce such violence or

abuse and thirdly the perpetrators of such violence or abuse. The final

systematic review updates the findings on cognitive delay associated

with institutionalised care. With a violence lens, cognitive delay may well be considered under the umbrella of neglect. Maltreatment

and abuse may be a driver of cognitive delay. The keyword search covered several electronic databases and studies were included for

data abstraction if they met adequacy criteria. Eight studies were

identified on the prevalence of abuse in institutions and a further

three studies reported on interventions. Only one study was identified

documenting peer on peer violence in institutions. Sixty-six studies

were identified examining cognitive development for institutionalised

children. All but two of these record cognitive deficits associated with

institutionalisation. Only two asked about violence or abuse which

was found to be higher in institutionalised children. Overall the abuse

experiences of children in institutions are poorly recorded, and in one

study violence was associated with high suicidal attempts. The major

intervention pathway for ameliorating cognitive challenge seems

to be placement out of the institutions which shows benefits and

redresses some cognitive outcomes – yet not a total panacea. The

single study providing training and monitoring of harsh punishment

and maltreatment showed immediate and decided reductions. This

data suggest, despite the paucity of studies, violence and abuse, by

commission or omission is prevalent in institutions, influences

child well-being and is amenable to intervention. Simple training

or more complex structures to place children within conducive

alternative environments (or to avoid institutionalised placements in the first place) seem to be the main pathway of intervention.

Published with courtersy of the Commons who hold copyright of the material and may not be uesd for commercial purposes.

Guest Column

Child violence experiences in institutionalised/

orphanage care

Lorraine Sherr, Kathryn J. Roberts & Natasha Gandhi

ABSTRACT

Institutions are not necessarily good environments for children.

In the face of challenges such as HIV, Ebola, poverty, conflict and

disaster the numbers have grown rather than reduced. Some

countries have closed institutions down driven by findings that

cognitive developmental delay is associated with institutional care.

Yet insight into abuse and violence within institutionalised settings is

neglected. Maltreatment -violence and abuse -may be an issue. This

systematic review series addresses violence and abuse experiences in

institutionalised care, exploring firstly the frequency of abuse/violence

in institutions, secondly any interventions to reduce such violence or

abuse and thirdly the perpetrators of such violence or abuse. The final

systematic review updates the findings on cognitive delay associated

with institutionalised care. With a violence lens, cognitive delay may well be considered under the umbrella of neglect. Maltreatment

and abuse may be a driver of cognitive delay. The keyword search covered several electronic databases and studies were included for

data abstraction if they met adequacy criteria. Eight studies were

identified on the prevalence of abuse in institutions and a further

three studies reported on interventions. Only one study was identified

documenting peer on peer violence in institutions. Sixty-six studies

were identified examining cognitive development for institutionalised

children. All but two of these record cognitive deficits associated with

institutionalisation. Only two asked about violence or abuse which

was found to be higher in institutionalised children. Overall the abuse

experiences of children in institutions are poorly recorded, and in one

study violence was associated with high suicidal attempts. The major

intervention pathway for ameliorating cognitive challenge seems

to be placement out of the institutions which shows benefits and

redresses some cognitive outcomes – yet not a total panacea. The

single study providing training and monitoring of harsh punishment

and maltreatment showed immediate and decided reductions. This

data suggest, despite the paucity of studies, violence and abuse, by

commission or omission is prevalent in institutions, influences

child well-being and is amenable to intervention. Simple training

or more complex structures to place children within conducive

alternative environments (or to avoid institutionalised placements in the first place) seem to be the main pathway of intervention.

Published with courtersy of the Commons who hold copyright of the material and may not be uesd for commercial purposes.

Guest Column

Child violence experiences in institutionalised/

orphanage care

Lorraine Sherr, Kathryn J. Roberts & Natasha Gandhi

ABSTRACT

Institutions are not necessarily good environments for children.

In the face of challenges such as HIV, Ebola, poverty, conflict and

disaster the numbers have grown rather than reduced. Some

countries have closed institutions down driven by findings that

cognitive developmental delay is associated with institutional care.

Yet insight into abuse and violence within institutionalised settings is

neglected. Maltreatment -violence and abuse -may be an issue. This

systematic review series addresses violence and abuse experiences in

institutionalised care, exploring firstly the frequency of abuse/violence

in institutions, secondly any interventions to reduce such violence or

abuse and thirdly the perpetrators of such violence or abuse. The final

systematic review updates the findings on cognitive delay associated

with institutionalised care. With a violence lens, cognitive delay may well be considered under the umbrella of neglect. Maltreatment

and abuse may be a driver of cognitive delay. The keyword search covered several electronic databases and studies were included for

data abstraction if they met adequacy criteria. Eight studies were

identified on the prevalence of abuse in institutions and a further

three studies reported on interventions. Only one study was identified

documenting peer on peer violence in institutions. Sixty-six studies

were identified examining cognitive development for institutionalised

children. All but two of these record cognitive deficits associated with

institutionalisation. Only two asked about violence or abuse which

was found to be higher in institutionalised children. Overall the abuse

experiences of children in institutions are poorly recorded, and in one

study violence was associated with high suicidal attempts. The major

intervention pathway for ameliorating cognitive challenge seems

to be placement out of the institutions which shows benefits and

redresses some cognitive outcomes – yet not a total panacea. The

single study providing training and monitoring of harsh punishment

and maltreatment showed immediate and decided reductions. This

data suggest, despite the paucity of studies, violence and abuse, by

commission or omission is prevalent in institutions, influences

child well-being and is amenable to intervention. Simple training

or more complex structures to place children within conducive

alternative environments (or to avoid institutionalised placements in the first place) seem to be the main pathway of intervention.

Published with courtersy of the Commons who hold copyright of the material and may not be uesd for commercial purposes.

Guest Column

Child violence experiences in institutionalised/

orphanage care

Lorraine Sherr, Kathryn J. Roberts & Natasha Gandhi

ABSTRACT

Institutions are not necessarily good environments for children.

In the face of challenges such as HIV, Ebola, poverty, conflict and

disaster the numbers have grown rather than reduced. Some

countries have closed institutions down driven by findings that

cognitive developmental delay is associated with institutional care.

Yet insight into abuse and violence within institutionalised settings is

neglected. Maltreatment -violence and abuse -may be an issue. This

systematic review series addresses violence and abuse experiences in

institutionalised care, exploring firstly the frequency of abuse/violence

in institutions, secondly any interventions to reduce such violence or

abuse and thirdly the perpetrators of such violence or abuse. The final

systematic review updates the findings on cognitive delay associated

with institutionalised care. With a violence lens, cognitive delay may well be considered under the umbrella of neglect. Maltreatment

and abuse may be a driver of cognitive delay. The keyword search covered several electronic databases and studies were included for

data abstraction if they met adequacy criteria. Eight studies were

identified on the prevalence of abuse in institutions and a further

three studies reported on interventions. Only one study was identified

documenting peer on peer violence in institutions. Sixty-six studies

were identified examining cognitive development for institutionalised

children. All but two of these record cognitive deficits associated with

institutionalisation. Only two asked about violence or abuse which

was found to be higher in institutionalised children. Overall the abuse

experiences of children in institutions are poorly recorded, and in one

study violence was associated with high suicidal attempts. The major

intervention pathway for ameliorating cognitive challenge seems

to be placement out of the institutions which shows benefits and

redresses some cognitive outcomes – yet not a total panacea. The

single study providing training and monitoring of harsh punishment

and maltreatment showed immediate and decided reductions. This

data suggest, despite the paucity of studies, violence and abuse, by

commission or omission is prevalent in institutions, influences

child well-being and is amenable to intervention. Simple training

or more complex structures to place children within conducive

alternative environments (or to avoid institutionalised placements in the first place) seem to be the main pathway of intervention.

Published with courtersy of the Commons who hold copyright of the material and may not be uesd for commercial purposes.

Guest Column

Child violence experiences in institutionalised/

orphanage care

Lorraine Sherr, Kathryn J. Roberts & Natasha Gandhi

ABSTRACT

Institutions are not necessarily good environments for children.

In the face of challenges such as HIV, Ebola, poverty, conflict and

disaster the numbers have grown rather than reduced. Some

countries have closed institutions down driven by findings that

cognitive developmental delay is associated with institutional care.

Yet insight into abuse and violence within institutionalised settings is

neglected. Maltreatment -violence and abuse -may be an issue. This

systematic review series addresses violence and abuse experiences in

institutionalised care, exploring firstly the frequency of abuse/violence

in institutions, secondly any interventions to reduce such violence or

abuse and thirdly the perpetrators of such violence or abuse. The final

systematic review updates the findings on cognitive delay associated

with institutionalised care. With a violence lens, cognitive delay may well be considered under the umbrella of neglect. Maltreatment

and abuse may be a driver of cognitive delay. The keyword search covered several electronic databases and studies were included for

data abstraction if they met adequacy criteria. Eight studies were

identified on the prevalence of abuse in institutions and a further

three studies reported on interventions. Only one study was identified

documenting peer on peer violence in institutions. Sixty-six studies

were identified examining cognitive development for institutionalised

children. All but two of these record cognitive deficits associated with

institutionalisation. Only two asked about violence or abuse which

was found to be higher in institutionalised children. Overall the abuse

experiences of children in institutions are poorly recorded, and in one

study violence was associated with high suicidal attempts. The major

intervention pathway for ameliorating cognitive challenge seems

to be placement out of the institutions which shows benefits and

redresses some cognitive outcomes – yet not a total panacea. The

single study providing training and monitoring of harsh punishment

and maltreatment showed immediate and decided reductions. This

data suggest, despite the paucity of studies, violence and abuse, by

commission or omission is prevalent in institutions, influences

child well-being and is amenable to intervention. Simple training

or more complex structures to place children within conducive

alternative environments (or to avoid institutionalised placements in the first place) seem to be the main pathway of intervention.

Published with courtersy of the Commons who hold copyright of the material and may not be uesd for commercial purposes.

Guest Column

Child violence experiences in institutionalised/

orphanage care

Lorraine Sherr, Kathryn J. Roberts & Natasha Gandhi

ABSTRACT

Institutions are not necessarily good environments for children.

In the face of challenges such as HIV, Ebola, poverty, conflict and

disaster the numbers have grown rather than reduced. Some

countries have closed institutions down driven by findings that

cognitive developmental delay is associated with institutional care.

Yet insight into abuse and violence within institutionalised settings is

neglected. Maltreatment -violence and abuse -may be an issue. This

systematic review series addresses violence and abuse experiences in

institutionalised care, exploring firstly the frequency of abuse/violence

in institutions, secondly any interventions to reduce such violence or

abuse and thirdly the perpetrators of such violence or abuse. The final

systematic review updates the findings on cognitive delay associated

with institutionalised care. With a violence lens, cognitive delay may well be considered under the umbrella of neglect. Maltreatment

and abuse may be a driver of cognitive delay. The keyword search covered several electronic databases and studies were included for

data abstraction if they met adequacy criteria. Eight studies were

identified on the prevalence of abuse in institutions and a further

three studies reported on interventions. Only one study was identified

documenting peer on peer violence in institutions. Sixty-six studies

were identified examining cognitive development for institutionalised

children. All but two of these record cognitive deficits associated with

institutionalisation. Only two asked about violence or abuse which

was found to be higher in institutionalised children. Overall the abuse

experiences of children in institutions are poorly recorded, and in one

study violence was associated with high suicidal attempts. The major

intervention pathway for ameliorating cognitive challenge seems

to be placement out of the institutions which shows benefits and

redresses some cognitive outcomes – yet not a total panacea. The

single study providing training and monitoring of harsh punishment

and maltreatment showed immediate and decided reductions. This

data suggest, despite the paucity of studies, violence and abuse, by

commission or omission is prevalent in institutions, influences

child well-being and is amenable to intervention. Simple training

or more complex structures to place children within conducive

alternative environments (or to avoid institutionalised placements in the first place) seem to be the main pathway of intervention.

Published with courtersy of the Commons who hold copyright of the material and may not be uesd for commercial purposes.

Guest Column

Child violence experiences in institutionalised/

orphanage care

Lorraine Sherr, Kathryn J. Roberts & Natasha Gandhi

ABSTRACT

Institutions are not necessarily good environments for children.

In the face of challenges such as HIV, Ebola, poverty, conflict and

disaster the numbers have grown rather than reduced. Some

countries have closed institutions down driven by findings that

cognitive developmental delay is associated with institutional care.

Yet insight into abuse and violence within institutionalised settings is

neglected. Maltreatment -violence and abuse -may be an issue. This

systematic review series addresses violence and abuse experiences in

institutionalised care, exploring firstly the frequency of abuse/violence

in institutions, secondly any interventions to reduce such violence or

abuse and thirdly the perpetrators of such violence or abuse. The final

systematic review updates the findings on cognitive delay associated

with institutionalised care. With a violence lens, cognitive delay may well be considered under the umbrella of neglect. Maltreatment

and abuse may be a driver of cognitive delay. The keyword search covered several electronic databases and studies were included for

data abstraction if they met adequacy criteria. Eight studies were

identified on the prevalence of abuse in institutions and a further

three studies reported on interventions. Only one study was identified

documenting peer on peer violence in institutions. Sixty-six studies

were identified examining cognitive development for institutionalised

children. All but two of these record cognitive deficits associated with

institutionalisation. Only two asked about violence or abuse which

was found to be higher in institutionalised children. Overall the abuse

experiences of children in institutions are poorly recorded, and in one

study violence was associated with high suicidal attempts. The major

intervention pathway for ameliorating cognitive challenge seems

to be placement out of the institutions which shows benefits and

redresses some cognitive outcomes – yet not a total panacea. The

single study providing training and monitoring of harsh punishment

and maltreatment showed immediate and decided reductions. This

data suggest, despite the paucity of studies, violence and abuse, by

commission or omission is prevalent in institutions, influences

child well-being and is amenable to intervention. Simple training

or more complex structures to place children within conducive

alternative environments (or to avoid institutionalised placements in the first place) seem to be the main pathway of intervention.

Published with courtersy of the Commons who hold copyright of the material and may not be uesd for commercial purposes.

Guest Column

Child violence experiences in institutionalised/

orphanage care

Lorraine Sherr, Kathryn J. Roberts & Natasha Gandhi

ABSTRACT

Institutions are not necessarily good environments for children.

In the face of challenges such as HIV, Ebola, poverty, conflict and

disaster the numbers have grown rather than reduced. Some

countries have closed institutions down driven by findings that

cognitive developmental delay is associated with institutional care.

Yet insight into abuse and violence within institutionalised settings is

neglected. Maltreatment -violence and abuse -may be an issue. This

systematic review series addresses violence and abuse experiences in

institutionalised care, exploring firstly the frequency of abuse/violence

in institutions, secondly any interventions to reduce such violence or

abuse and thirdly the perpetrators of such violence or abuse. The final

systematic review updates the findings on cognitive delay associated

with institutionalised care. With a violence lens, cognitive delay may well be considered under the umbrella of neglect. Maltreatment

and abuse may be a driver of cognitive delay. The keyword search covered several electronic databases and studies were included for

data abstraction if they met adequacy criteria. Eight studies were

identified on the prevalence of abuse in institutions and a further

three studies reported on interventions. Only one study was identified

documenting peer on peer violence in institutions. Sixty-six studies

were identified examining cognitive development for institutionalised

children. All but two of these record cognitive deficits associated with

institutionalisation. Only two asked about violence or abuse which

was found to be higher in institutionalised children. Overall the abuse

experiences of children in institutions are poorly recorded, and in one

study violence was associated with high suicidal attempts. The major

intervention pathway for ameliorating cognitive challenge seems

to be placement out of the institutions which shows benefits and

redresses some cognitive outcomes – yet not a total panacea. The

single study providing training and monitoring of harsh punishment

and maltreatment showed immediate and decided reductions. This

data suggest, despite the paucity of studies, violence and abuse, by

commission or omission is prevalent in institutions, influences

child well-being and is amenable to intervention. Simple training

or more complex structures to place children within conducive

alternative environments (or to avoid institutionalised placements in the first place) seem to be the main pathway of intervention.

Published with courtersy of the Commons who hold copyright of the material and may not be uesd for commercial purposes.

Guest Column

Child violence experiences in institutionalised/

orphanage care

Lorraine Sherr, Kathryn J. Roberts & Natasha Gandhi

ABSTRACT

Institutions are not necessarily good environments for children.

In the face of challenges such as HIV, Ebola, poverty, conflict and

disaster the numbers have grown rather than reduced. Some

countries have closed institutions down driven by findings that

cognitive developmental delay is associated with institutional care.

Yet insight into abuse and violence within institutionalised settings is

neglected. Maltreatment -violence and abuse -may be an issue. This

systematic review series addresses violence and abuse experiences in

institutionalised care, exploring firstly the frequency of abuse/violence

in institutions, secondly any interventions to reduce such violence or

abuse and thirdly the perpetrators of such violence or abuse. The final

systematic review updates the findings on cognitive delay associated

with institutionalised care. With a violence lens, cognitive delay may well be considered under the umbrella of neglect. Maltreatment

and abuse may be a driver of cognitive delay. The keyword search covered several electronic databases and studies were included for

data abstraction if they met adequacy criteria. Eight studies were

identified on the prevalence of abuse in institutions and a further

three studies reported on interventions. Only one study was identified

documenting peer on peer violence in institutions. Sixty-six studies

were identified examining cognitive development for institutionalised

children. All but two of these record cognitive deficits associated with

institutionalisation. Only two asked about violence or abuse which

was found to be higher in institutionalised children. Overall the abuse

experiences of children in institutions are poorly recorded, and in one

study violence was associated with high suicidal attempts. The major

intervention pathway for ameliorating cognitive challenge seems

to be placement out of the institutions which shows benefits and

redresses some cognitive outcomes – yet not a total panacea. The

single study providing training and monitoring of harsh punishment

and maltreatment showed immediate and decided reductions. This

data suggest, despite the paucity of studies, violence and abuse, by

commission or omission is prevalent in institutions, influences

child well-being and is amenable to intervention. Simple training

or more complex structures to place children within conducive

alternative environments (or to avoid institutionalised placements in the first place) seem to be the main pathway of intervention.

Published with courtersy of the Commons who hold copyright of the material and may not be uesd for commercial purposes.

 

 

Above the Cut ~The Nudes of Dasguptarts

Published February 15, 2019 by paulandpaulasbooks

Sudipta Steve Dasgupta, the artist behind Dasguptarts is a hugely talented and successful artist.  The mural concept, “A Father’s Pain” that I shared eleven days ago on the blog, Mother, God & Father’s Love, evokes deep emotions and truly needs more of a home than a blog.

Following Gallery is in celebration of Love.

A Father’s Pain51162353_2225227224358984_2869315763234144256_n

Passion Of A MachinePassion of a Machine

Heart and Soul                                        heart n soul copy                                                                                                                                    Solitary ConfinementSolitary Confinement

Reality ShowREALITY SHOW

Undelivered LetterUndelivered Letter

Autumn and a Widow 13-Autumn-and-a-widow

Relaxing                                  Relaxing copy

Of a Statueof a Statue

Once Upon Atrocityonce-upon-atrocity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Body and Soul            body n soul

Ica Iova ~ Above the Cut ~ Interview

Published February 14, 2019 by paulandpaulasbooks

Hi Paula, here it is again. P.S. I couldn’t open your attachment and I only saw 7 questions, so I added a few of my own. Thus starts my interview with a lady I met on Facebook years ago.  She was an aspiring writer, I already had a published book, but our main thrust was friendship.

Over the years, Ica has written award-winning books, won contests and generally just stayed the course eyes forward in accomplishing goal after goal.  I would recommend any of her books; they all hold solid engaging stories.  I will be reviewing her first book, Whispers, an award-winning book.

 

When did you first realize you wanted to be a writer?

I think, subconsciously, I always knew that writing was what sparked my fire. My grandparents were great story-tellers, and from a young age, they instilled in me the love of story-telling—but like many other writers, I had to choose a different path and work for a bi-monthly paycheck.

 

How long does it take you to write a book?

A number of factors play a role in how long it takes to write a book—the amount of research necessary, my muse, length of the book, etc. But on average, I can finish writing a 50,000 words book in three to four months.

What is your work schedule like when you’re writing?

I try to write at least 2000 words every day, even when my inspiration is gone or hiding. Sometimes it consists of random thoughts, but you’ll be surprised how efficient moving words around could be.

What would you say is your interesting writing quirk?

Hmm. I had to think about this for a moment because to me my quirks aren’t just quirks. It’s the way I write. I’d have to go with my readers’ comments that my characters act and sound very realistic. And that is because I don’t just write what comes to mind (well, I do, but then I delete it, *big grins*) I give each character his/her own personality, his/her own goals, and I let them tell me What’s stopping them from achieving that goal. Is it his arrogant personality? Her defiance?  These two are my favorite since they tend to paint strong personalities. I often eavesdrop on other people’s private conversations (I know, bad habit) but I like to hear how real people carry on a discussion. On rewrites, I may change the dialogue several times. If it doesn’t make sense to me, it probably won’t make sense to anyone else.

How do books get published?

There are three ways (that I know of).

  1. The traditional way, which is a long and exhausting process, especially if your confidence in your writing is not up to date. This is a very competitive industry, and you may get lucky at your first try, or you may get a thousand rejections before a publisher/agent agrees to even look at your work. It doesn’t mean your work is not worthy of publishing; it merely says that publishers are invaded with submissions and they can choose. You have to make sure that when you submit your manuscript, you and your work stand out from thousands of others that the publisher may have received that day.
  2. The DIY self-publishing way. Several platforms allow you to publish your book at minimum or no cost to you. All you need is a computer and to be able to follow instructions.
  3.  Pay a vanity press to do it for you. I strongly advise against this form of publishing. These organizations are not cheap, and they all promise you the world when in fact all they want is your money. But don’t take my word for it. Do the research yourselves. 

Where do you get your information or ideas for your books?

Everywhere! Literally. Sometimes it takes as little as a word to spark an entire story. I also do a lot of research on the Internet and by interviewing people in different fields to get my facts straight.

When did you write your first book and how old were you?

I told this story many times, but I never get tired of it. In my second grade, the curriculum included reading a story—Puiul (The Chick) by Ion Alexandru Bratescu-Voinesti. It’s a somber story from the Romanian literature, about a baby quail, who hadn’t listened to its mother to sit still with its siblings while she tried to divert a hunter’s attention. The naughty chick flies from its hiding place, and the hunter shoots and injures it badly enough so it can’t join its migrating family to warmer lands. 

Though the story is meant to teach children to listen to their parents, I hated the image of a baby quail slowly freezing to death. So, I did what writers do: I re-wrote it. My version had a happy ending, where a child founds the injured bird and takes it home to nurse it back to health.

What is your favorite, and your least favorite thing about writing?

When my mind buzzes with ideas, I can’t seem to type fast enough, to put it all down on paper. Yes, sometimes during rewrites my head may drop on the desk, and I may ask myself aloud, “What the heck were you thinking,” but when that new idea pops in, I feel like a child the night before Christmas. Editing, on the other hand, and I bet I’m not alone in this, feels like a chore. Believe me: there is a good reason why I’m a writer, not an editor.

What would you most like readers to know about you?

Of course, first and foremost I’d like my readers to know the professional side of me—how I started to write; why I started to write; how each one of my prior jobs has helped prepare me to take on this crucial role. But I also like my readers to know me beyond my writing. I want them to connect with me on a personal level as well. While I’d love to share everything about myself—my likes, dislikes, the places I’ve visited, the oceans I’ve crossed, there isn’t enough room for all of it here and now, but I like my readers to know that I appreciate the little things money can’t buy. I am also open-minded and approachable.

What is your WIP?

I just finished writing another romantic suspense—Convenient Lies—and I’m putting the finishing touches on a historical fiction that is a mix of fact and fiction inspired by my own story. Set in two wolds, and two different cultures, Reflections will resonate with a lot of people—immigrants or not—because it offers a window into the life of people who choose to leave their homes and everything familiar and plunge into the unknown in search for better lives.

ica lova photo

 

Ica Iova – Award-Winning Author

http://www.icasworld.net

http://amzn.to/2zE8P9F